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What are you reading?
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levski
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 21, 2010 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

THE SHADOW wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
Heading south of the border after this homestand so I hit the bookstore last night and picked up a baseball book for some beach reading.

The Bullpen Gospels by Dirk Heyhurst.

Anyone here read it? With our bullpen problems I thought it would make a good read. Maybe JB can borrow it when Im thru. Wink


Finished this and its one of the best baseball books Ive read in a long long time.

This one makes you cry one chapter and laugh out loud the next.

Great job get this one your will enjoy it.


It's been on my wish list at amazon for a while. Finally ordered it along with Doug Glanville's book...
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THE SHADOW
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2010 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

levski wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
Heading south of the border after this homestand so I hit the bookstore last night and picked up a baseball book for some beach reading.

The Bullpen Gospels by Dirk Heyhurst.

Anyone here read it? With our bullpen problems I thought it would make a good read. Maybe JB can borrow it when Im thru. Wink


Finished this and its one of the best baseball books Ive read in a long long time.

This one makes you cry one chapter and laugh out loud the next.

Great job get this one your will enjoy it.


It's been on my wish list at amazon for a while. Finally ordered it along with Doug Glanville's book...


Once you start with this one Lev you wont stop. Kieth Oberman called it baseballs version of Catcher in the Rye.
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TAP
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2010 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

THE SHADOW wrote:
levski wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
Heading south of the border after this homestand so I hit the bookstore last night and picked up a baseball book for some beach reading.

The Bullpen Gospels by Dirk Heyhurst.

Anyone here read it? With our bullpen problems I thought it would make a good read. Maybe JB can borrow it when Im thru. Wink


Finished this and its one of the best baseball books Ive read in a long long time.

This one makes you cry one chapter and laugh out loud the next.

Great job get this one your will enjoy it.


It's been on my wish list at amazon for a while. Finally ordered it along with Doug Glanville's book...


Once you start with this one Lev you wont stop. Kieth Oberman called it baseballs version of Catcher in the Rye.

Ah man.... my finger was on ENTER to confirm order when you posted that Olbermann thing. Why'd you have to do that? Screw Keith, I'm ordering it in spite of him.
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THE SHADOW
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2010 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

TAP wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
levski wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
THE SHADOW wrote:
Heading south of the border after this homestand so I hit the bookstore last night and picked up a baseball book for some beach reading.

The Bullpen Gospels by Dirk Heyhurst.

Anyone here read it? With our bullpen problems I thought it would make a good read. Maybe JB can borrow it when Im thru. Wink


Finished this and its one of the best baseball books Ive read in a long long time.

This one makes you cry one chapter and laugh out loud the next.

Great job get this one your will enjoy it.


It's been on my wish list at amazon for a while. Finally ordered it along with Doug Glanville's book...


Once you start with this one Lev you wont stop. Kieth Oberman called it baseballs version of Catcher in the Rye.

Ah man.... my finger was on ENTER to confirm order when you posted that Olbermann thing. Why'd you have to do that? Screw Keith, I'm ordering it in spite of him.


Get the book anyway TAP you will love it.

This video maybe not so much. Wink

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xm4WFN7khbY&feature=player_embedded
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levski
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finished Dirk Hayhurst's book, and loved it. Great writing and great story-telling it. Easily one of the most enjoyable books I've read in a long time.

Been trying to identify some of the pitchers in the book (pitchers he refers to using some nicknames). Am positive that "Frenchy" is Wade LeBlanc.

It's tougher with some of the relievers as they're your generic right handed relievers, but there are a couple of guys in there that I think I've identified.

Obviously some guys are referred to by their real names, like Daigle (not that one), Daego, Buschmann, also some hitters (Macias, Headley, Venable)

Am reading Doug Glanville's book right now, but am not really digging it. He meanders a lot, and his book really reads like a bunch of random anecdotes.

It's a shame because his articles for the NY Times are very good. But his ability to tell a story over a 200+ page book is lacking, unfortunately.
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levski
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And as luck would have it

http://twitter.com/TheGarfoose/status/17878109980

Quote:
Well, it's official. I'm signed to deliver a sequel. Just inked a 2 book deal with Kensington Press. More Bullpen Gospels are on the way!


http://twitter.com/TheGarfoose/status/17878445404

Quote:
For the official break on my next TWO books via Publishers Weekly, Check this out (Under Kensington...) http://bit.ly/b96SGk


From the link
Quote:
Kensington, HCI Get Down with Boys of Summer
This week we have two notable deals with major league ball players. In the first, Michael Hamilton, editor-in-chief of Kensington's Citadel Press, signed pitcher Dirk Hayhurst to a two-book deal, continuing a standing relationship the imprint has with the Toronto Blue Jays reliever. Hayhurst's first book, the memoir The Bullpen Gospels, was published by Citadel in April and details his time in the minors. The first book in the new deal, Forty Days and Forty Nights, picks up where Gospels left off and chronicles Hayhurst's tumultuous 2008, his first year as a major leaguer and as a new husband. The second book, Strike Out the Devil, will offer Hayhurst's unique take on being a professional ball player and a devout Christian. Hamilton took world rights to the books from agent Jason Yarn at Paradigm; Forty Days is scheduled for 2012 and Strike Out for 2013.

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THE SHADOW
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great news on the sequels lev. I knew you would like the book.

I was going to give my copy to JB as a gift/joke but cant now.

I do want to pass it along though. First one who wants it and can pick it up at an upcoming ballgame and its yours.
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Prosopis
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

THE SHADOW wrote:
Great news on the sequels lev. I knew you would like the book.

I was going to give my copy to JB as a gift/joke but cant now.

I do want to pass it along though. First one who wants it and can pick it up at an upcoming ballgame and its yours.


I will take it if you still have it when I see you.
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Prosopis
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

50 years ago today. One of my favorites was published.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128340180&sc=fb&cc=fp


Fifty years ago, Harper Lee had the kind of success that most writers only dream about: Shortly after her novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, was published on July 11, 1960, it hit the best-seller lists. In 1961, it won a Pulitzer Prize, and in 1962, it was made into an Academy Award-winning film. It has never gone out of print.

Lee stepped out of the limelight and stopped doing interviews years ago and she never wrote another book. Still, her influence has far outlasted most writers of her generation.

For the high-schoolers reading To Kill a Mockingbird today, America is a very different place than it was when Lee wrote her novel 50 years ago. Lee's story of Scout Finch and her father, Atticus a small-town Southern lawyer who defends a black man unjustly accused of rape came out just as the nation was fighting over school desegregation.

Today, in a 10th grade English class at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Va., students of many different races and ethnicities are studying the book together. Their teacher, Laurel Taylor, says that the story still resonates and with students of all backgrounds.

"Trying to find your identity and realizing that your society doesn't always tell you the right thing" is a particularly profound message for teens, Taylor says. "Sometimes you have to go against what everyone else says to do the right thing. All that kind of resonates no matter where you come from."

Doing The Right Thing

When To Kill a Mockingbird was topping best-seller lists in 1960, protesters were organizing sit-ins at whites-only lunch counters across the South. The civil rights movement was well under way.

Joanne Gabbin, a professor of English at James Madison University in Virginia, grew up in the 1950s and '60s. She was just a child when she saw a photograph of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African-American teen who was viciously murdered after he reportedly whistled at a white woman.

"I was traumatized as a child by the whole thought of racism," Gabbin says. "And the fact that children weren't safe in this country ... [simply] because of the color of their skin."

Gabbin read To Kill a Mockingbird when she was 17, and says that for her, it was a pivotal book. In Tom Robinson, the African-American man unjustly accused of rape, she saw not a victim, but a hero. He reminded her of her father and grandfather African-American men who put up with untold humiliation in order to take care of their families. Atticus Finch gave her hope that there really were white people who would do the right thing and she believes the book may have helped to make that a reality.

"People who were determined to keep black people down ... were not going to be reading this book in the first place and were not going to be influenced," Gabbin says. "But I think those people who were moderate, who were more liberal, when they got to read To Kill a Mockingbird, they probably wanted to identify with the courageous character of Atticus Finch."

A New Way To Think About Race

When the film version of To Kill a Mockingbird came out in 1962, the character of Atticus became forever entwined with the actor who portrayed him, Gregory Peck. But whether you first encountered him on page or on screen, Atticus was unforgettable a modest man of great integrity, he managed to impart his wisdom without being too preachy.

"There's been some high talk around town to the effect that I shouldn't do much about defending this man," he tells his daughter, Scout, in the 1962 film adaptation. "If I didn't, I couldn't hold my head up in town. I couldn't even tell you or Jem not to do somethin' again."

The relationship between Atticus and his 6-year-old daughter is the emotional heart of the book. For many readers and for many female readers in particular feisty, fearless Scout is the most memorable character.

"The story of Scout's initiation and maturing is the story of finding out who you are in the world," says author Mary McDonagh Murphy. "And at the same time, the novel is about finding out who we are as a country."

Murphy's new book, Scout, Atticus & Boo, is based on interviews about To Kill a Mockingbird with well-known writers, journalists, historians and artists. Murphy says the novel, narrated from a child's point of view, gave white people, especially in the South, a nonthreatening way to think about race differently.

"The book is structured with all these indelible characters," Murphy says. "The ending is not this triumphant good over evil ... I mean there's real moral ambiguity to what happened. It all combined to allow them to question the moral order of things."

The questions raised by the book were part of a conversation that echoed around the country. It's a conversation that is still going on, and the book endures because people can relate to it in so many different ways.

"It's about race, it's about prejudice, it's about childhood, it's about parenting, it's about love, it's about loneliness there's something for everyone," Murphy says.

To Kill a Mockingbird didn't change everyone's mind, but it did open some. And it made an impression on many young people who, like Scout, were trying to get a grip on right and wrong in a world that is not always fair.
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DBWS08
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone here who likes Michael Connelly? He's one of my favorites, I've read every single one of his books. And, I just finished his latest, The Reversal, it's due out in October, but I got an advanced copy from a guy who was sitting next to me on a plane. In this story, Harry Bosch, a detective, and Mickey Haller, a defense attorney, joined forces to solve a brutal murder, a great read.
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